See dozens of Frank Lloyd Wright’s unbuilt, computer-rendered structures with incredible realism

David Romero uses modeling software to show how the famous architect’s unbuilt projects, such as a mile-tall tower in Chicago, might turn out.

Illinois, Chicago, skyscraper not built for Frank Lloyd Wright. Submission courtesy of David Romero.

Of the more than 1,000 buildings designed by the famous American architect Frank Lloyd Wright, more than half were unbuilt – or worse, demolished – by the time of his death in 1959 at the age of 91.

But now, Spanish architect David Romero has teamed up with the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation to show what those projects would look like today. New designs include Gordon’s Strong Automotive Target, a planetarium proposed in 1925, as well as the National Life Insurance Building, floating cabins in the Summer Colony on Lake Tahoe, and his most famous unrealized structure, the mile-tall skyscraper Chicago is well known for. Like Illinois.

“It all started as a project to help me improve my skills in using architectural rendering software tools,” Romero told Artnet News. “I have always loved Wright’s architecture, and thought it would be useful, from an academic point of view, to recreate those buildings that were either demolished or never built.”

He continued, “I began by modeling the Larkin Administration Building (in Buffalo, New York), as a landmark in architectural history, but realized halfway through that I had bit off more than I could chew since the building was so large and complex. I then decided to build A simpler building, Pauson House, which took me about six months to work in my spare time, and at last I had acquired enough knowledge to return to Larkin.

Romero posted these two performances online in amateur forums and received positive feedback. He was then contacted by the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, interested in helping him continue the project. He is currently working with the Foundation to publish his architectural offerings in its quarterly magazine.

Romero likens his own recreation of Wright to the work of a photographer. “I try to find the most beautiful picture but without forgetting that I must also describe the building in the best possible way,” he said. “For me, it’s very exciting to see final images of buildings come out of the computer because of the realism that can be achieved – when buildings are recreated virtually, layers and layers of detail are added until the image looks as real as it gets.” maybe.”

“The feeling I get is visiting those buildings,” Romero said. My work is like a journey or discovery.

Here’s a look at some of David Romero’s hyper-realistic visions of Frank Lloyd Wright’s unrealized projects.

Gordon’s strong target for cars
Sugarloaf Mountain, Maryland.
not built

Presented by David Romero, courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.

Presented by David Romero, courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.

Larkin Administration Building
Buffalo, New York
Built in 1903, demolished in 1950

Submission courtesy of David Romero.

Submission courtesy of David Romero.

The home of Rose and Gertrude Boson
Phoenix, Arizona
Built in 1942, it was destroyed by fire in 1943

Submission courtesy of David Romero.

Illinois
Chicago, Illinois
not built

Presented by David Romero, courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.

Presented by David Romero, courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.

Trinity Church
University of Oklahoma
not built

Submission courtesy of David Romero.

Morris House (Seacliff)
San Francisco, California
not built

Submission courtesy of David Romero.

Submission courtesy of David Romero.

National Life Insurance Building
Chicago, Illinois
not built

Presented by David Romero, courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.

Floating cabins in the summer colony
Lake Tahoe, California
not built

Submission courtesy of David Romero.

Huntington Hartford
Hollywood, California
not built

Submission courtesy of David Romero.

Butterfly Wing Bridge
San Francisco, California
not built

Submission courtesy of David Romero.

Arizona Capitol
Phoenix, Arizona
not built

Submission courtesy of David Romero.

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