Myron Goldfinger 1989 Chappaqua DeSafino House in Pictures

Myron Goldfinger 1989 Chappaqua DeSafino House in Pictures

The 1989 Myron Goldfinger custom-built home for the DiSavino family in Chappaqua has hit the market for the first time. The architect, who died this summer at the age of 90, was known for transforming simple geometric shapes into large, luxurious homes.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

In 33 years, the DiSavino family has never trick-or-treated. Their modern, dark gray home is hidden at the end of a long private drive, screened from the street by four acres of woods. But from afar, architecture buffs were looking forward to photos of their home — one of the blocky, white-and-gray mansions designed in the 1980s and 1990s by the modernist architect Myron Goldfinger, who died last month at age 90. … The Wolf of Wall Street.

Goldfinger probably hated those headlines; He wanted his homes to be quiet, almost spiritual, conversational spaces Architectural digest In 1980, he sought to achieve a “temple-like quality” through his use of “basic forms” and was as inspired by the simple mosques of Tunisia as he had been by Le Corbusier. The DiSavinos tapped it in part because they liked another religious space: Temple Beth El, which they attended when they moved to the area. The simple octagonal prayer room was designed by Louis Kahn, Goldfinger's mentor, and they liked the idea of ​​a house designed by one of Kahn's disciples. They also told Goldfinger that they necessary The serenity for which he and Kahn were famous; They had teenagers. Three daughters, ages 18, 13 and 7, wanted their own space, and the couple wanted privacy, too, said Eileen DiSavino. “The solution was wings at home, and Myron came up with that.”

The 319's design was inspired by a “segmented pinwheel,” according to Goldfinger. Like plastic blades wrapped around the axis of a pinwheel, there are four separate wings radiating from a large central chamber. The design allowed the separate wings — containing bedrooms and a home office — to feel secluded and private, while the living spaces below helped the family feel connected without feeling watched, says Peter Tripp, DiSavino's brother-in-law who also happens to be studying architecture at Goldfinger University. University of Pennsylvania. On visits, Tripp admired how the “pinwheel” allowed anyone in the great room to be aware of the TV turning on in the family room or chatter coming from the kitchen, but not see or hear well enough to intrude. When everyone gathers together in the great room, they stream in from the four corners of the house. “It's this wonderful unifying element that happens in the morning and evening,” Tripp said. “There's a very nice way this space keeps the family together – even when they want to be apart.”

The design may be unique to Goldfinger Homes, but it still bears many of his signatures: a 40-foot barrel ceiling, a floating doorway piercing that quadruple-height space, and walls of floor-to-ceiling windows that frame the view. The space also consists of simple geometric forms: two balconies and a courtyard in the shape of semicircles, and rooms in one wing that end at 45 degree angles to right triangles, giving pointed views. The floating staircase repeats the shape of a semicircle.

Elaine DiSavino does not recall ever objecting to any of Goldfinger's designs, other than to insist on an en suite bathroom. Tripp said her husband, Leonard DeSavino, who died in 2016, “wasn’t risk averse.” He was an entrepreneur and one of the first to participate in the communications revolution, co-founding a company that put pagers in American pockets. He was so enamored with the house that he visited it every day while it was built, and when it was completed, he remained in touch with Goldfinger for decades. Over the course of 33 years, the DiSavino family has done little to no modifications — replacing the spiral staircase with an elevator, and eliminating the steam shower (which could be added again). “We very much respected the dignity of what Myron had done and sought to preserve it — both outside and inside,” says DiSavino, who remembers the jaded contractors insisting on preserving every detail. “We like it, basically.”

Even as her children grew up and started their own lives, the home continued to serve as a place where they could reconnect. She now had seven grandchildren who visited her almost every holiday and most summer days, swimming in the saltwater pool, hitting balls on the tennis court, and shouting from the top of “The Bridge,” the family’s affectionate term for the floating atrium. “They were here this summer, and the kids were crying, saying, ‘This is our last time here,'” she said. “It was joyful.”

The DiSavino family has lived here since 1989, and they took care to uphold Goldfinger's original vision, sometimes replacing the simple wood slats on the exterior with matching materials.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

The foyer overlooks a four-acre lot in Chappaqua through an entrance with simple sliding glass doors.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

These doors lead to the house's great room, a living area that connects the family room to the first floor, the kitchen, the dining room, and the sun terrace – all with windows with fantastic views of the landscape.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

The great room's 40-foot-tall barrel ceiling also references a feature often used by Goldfinger's mentor, Louis Kahn, who used it to define the Kimbell Art Museum.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

Stairs in the great room lead to the second floor of the house, where Goldfinger has placed four bedrooms and a home office.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

When the family wakes up in the morning or heads to bed, they walk through the great room. “It's this wonderful unifying element that happens in the morning and evening,” says Peter Tripp, who married into the DiSavino family. “Everyone is leaving, but they intersect in this great space.”
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

Off the great room—directly in front of you in this photo—a wall mirrored at a 45-degree angle gives way to the dining room.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

The dining room is connected to the great room at the front, and has great views of the landscape at the back.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

Behind the dining room is a kitchen with a breakfast nook that lets in light through a greenhouse glass wall.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

The breakfast nook is such a great spot in the house that the DiSavinos also used it as a home office.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

A cut-out window in the breakfast nook helps frame intentional views of the landscape beyond.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

On the other side of the large central room, there is a family room that allows for relaxation. There is also a balcony outside.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

On the upper floor, there is a walkway around the great room, which helps connect the upper floor to the living area.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

The family called the floating entrance “The Bridge.”
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

The master suite has a spacious arc-shaped terrace.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

The master suite's bathroom is exactly as Goldfinger designed it, with steps leading to a bathtub and landline phone. Eileen DiSavino kept the landline, although these days she receives unwanted calls.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

A sauna is off the master suite, which also has two walk-in closets.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

A home office is off the master suite, which the DeSafinos have used in the past as an exercise room.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

One of two corner bedrooms with built-in desks, used by the younger DiSavino sisters.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

There is a fourth bedroom in its own wing and was used initially by the eldest daughter.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

Downstairs, a covered porch shows how Goldfinger's design blends outdoors and indoors: slate tiles transition seamlessly across the threshold.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

The windows offer commanding views of the forest and grounds.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

The path heads towards the backyard.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

Off the family room is a patio overlooking the saltwater pool.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

The pool has always been in use, and was crowded this summer as Ellen DeSavinos' seven grandchildren visited it for what may be the last time. “The children were crying,” she said. “It was joyful.”
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

Set on four acres that the Desavinos bought in 1988, the house is a blank canvas for Goldfinger's design of blocky, geometric shapes.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

There is a hot tub outside the pool in a more private wooded area.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

The Desavinos family bought the land and dreamed of a swimming pool and tennis court.
Photo: Brian Milton/Compass

(tags for translation)Westchester

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